Friday, 31 July 2015

EOMV – July - blowing hot and cold

July 2015 has been a month of contrast in my garden in terms of the weather. From extreme hot weather in the beginning to seriously cold towards the end of the month. Well, it’s not as if we have had any snow, but it actually dipped just below 10 degrees C one night and that’s rather cold for July in London. Spare a thought for those further north though, who had temperatures down towards zero that night. Brrr! And a week ago we had 24 hours with rain. Yay!! That was really good for parched gardens around here, would have liked to have a few more days like that, but according to most forecasts there won’t be a drop of rain the next 10 days. I am back to watering every evening.

I am trying to divide my time between the house and the garden, there is so much to do both inside and outside, but I am slowly getting things done.

I have a lot of ideas of how the garden can look like, and a neighbour of mine has what’s called a glass veranda over the area where I have my seating area. I would LOVE to have the same. It is basically 4 pillars with a glass roof, but having looked online for prices I can see I will not be buying it ready made and installed, I have not got that deep pockets, the prices start at £6.000! There are DIY kits that start at £2.000, but even that are way more than I can afford. I will have to come up with a solution to cover the seating area that won’t break the bank....

Last month I showed you this area where I had taken out the plumtree in the middle and the choycia next to the backdoor. Since then the Photinia has gone too, the roots are still in the ground but I have cut it completely down. The next to go is the pyracantha in the right corner and then I am starting on the Parthenocissus on the wall. I have decided to remove half of it for now and keep the part from the shed up till the middle of the wall. It will be a big job to take it all out and a huge amount of bags for the council to collect for their green waste collection, but I think it will be worth it in the end. I have already planned what to grow up the wall once it is cleared :-)

The biggest change since last month is The Shade Garden. I have taken out the fence! I sat on my trusty old garden stool and sawed off the fence, piece by piece and then pulled up all the fence posts afterwards. Some of the posts came out quite easily, some of them had to be dug out using water, a lot of patience and just elbow grease.

Then I laid bark in all the beds and finally all my shade plants could get a better place to stay than out on the patio.

Nothing is planted yet as the ground is not ready for planting yet, besides, I am not sure where everything will go eventually, but the plants are much happier in their pots here anyway.

Just to remind you, this is what it looked like before I started on the shade garden....

My previous garden had a lot of shade and I have quite a lot of plants that can go here – that doesn’t mean I won’t be looking at getting a few more though, I am sure I can manage to squeeze in a few (many) more! In my previous garden I used to stack my plants and bulbs like sardines, side by side and on top of each other – I had a garden filled to the rafters most of the year. This garden is bigger and can take many more plants than I currently have. What a luxury problem. I need to buy more plants!

Unfortunately the soil here isn’t as nice as in my previous garden, I have finally managed to do a soil test, the one I took was in The Shade Garden and there the pH is above 7. Not so good news for all my acid loving plants, spreading the bark is first step in lowering the pH, but it will take many years to create such a nice soil as the one I made in my previous garden.

At this end of The Shade Garden it is actually quite sunny, it is the ceanothus and the apple tree that create the shade and on the side here I intend to remove the forsythia and up against the fence I am going to have a greenhouse – a 6x4 ft greenhouse, that’s all there is room for. I have never had a greenhouse before so that’s better than nothing, wish I could have a bigger one, but I just can’t find a suitable space for a bigger.

And here, on what’s a rather yellow, ugly lawn which will be removed, is where I am placing my raised beds for vegetables and strawberries. Behind the raised beds, up along the back fence I am planning to have a compost bin and a bin for leaf mold.

So that’s the plan so far – now I just need to put it all into action.

Do you remember from last post hat I was eagerly waiting for the first Hibiscus syriacus flowers to open? I have always wanted one, especially a double one, and I was pleasantly surprised when I moved in to find a large, mature Hibiscus in this garden.

And look at those flowers! I am quite sure this is Hibiscus syriacus 'Lady Stanley'.

My daylilies are coming to an end, only the late flowering are still going strong. And I think I have a new favourite among the daylilies – ‘Blackberries and cream’!

I wish I could send you scent via my blog, because once you step out in my front garden you are hit by the most amazing scent of lilies! Some people say they don’t like lilies in the house because they smell too much, but every lily I have smell different. Some are very sweet, some are fruitier.

I have 164 lilies from 34 varieties and they have been flowering since early June. Every time I have a delivery, the drivers – mostly men – comment on the nice scent of the lilies as they all walk past them to get to my front door!

I showed you some of my lilies last time, here are some more flowering right now.






I haven’t written much about my fuchsias lately, I must admit after all the problems with fuchsia gall mite I got a bit fed up with them. I have placed them all on the inside of my front garden and they get watered, but that’s it. I don’t tend to them at all.

Most of them flower and look fine, some are not fine at all. My plan is to just leave them to it, those that succumb to FGM will go in the bin in late autumn, those that still look fine will be allowed to stay. This is survival of the fittest in real life.

This week we had a ferocious windy weather, the apples started dropping from the tree and I realised that many of the apples were ready to pick. Being new to apple growing, I had done a bit of research, but although the apples came off the tree very easy, the pips are yellow and not black inside. According to what I have read it should mean they actually are not ripe after all.

The apples taste sharp, but sweet, and are quite hard - I would compare them to Granny Smith – but I am no apple connoisseur. I picked those that came off easy and left the rest on the tree. Some have a red blush on one side.

And some are green all the way round. I have no idea what kind of apples they are and if they are supposed to be green, yellow or red – but some of them are quite big. And from what I have read I think last week of July must be quite early for apples to be ready to harvest, but I can’t tell you how many apples that have fallen from the tree this week, probably a whole bucket full. So I assume they are ready to be picked if they fall off easy. I never knew picking apples were so difficult though....as soon as I pick one apple, 4 or 5 from the same branch fall to the ground! Trying to catch them before they fall is almost impossible, I am not a good juggler and in any case I have only one hand as the other one is on my crutch. I don’t know what to do with all the apples, I have given away bags of them already, and my fridge is full of apples!

I also have the first cherry tomatoes ready to eat, and the plums seems ripe too, although again – I don’t really know what they are supposed to look like, if they should be uniform red, or even darker than this or if it’s normal that they are plum coloured on one side and yellow on the other. They taste nice and are soft, so I have eaten them. Many!

There are still lots of apples left on the tree, many of the smaller fruit on the inside.

And the beautiful rose climbing in the apple tree is still producing new flowers.

Here is the plumtree, lots of plums still left, with various shades of green, yellow, plum and aubergine.

In my temporary vegetable garden I am attempting to grow sweet pepper for the first time. This is two plants in the same container, the one to the right is looking nice and healthy with lots of flowers and several small peppers on already. The plant to the left has black spotted, curly leaves and is still in buds. Not sure what’s happened to it, they have got the exact same environment and same treatment from me.

Do you remember the huge hydrangea I had in my previous garden, the one up against the fence next to my big camellia? I took a few cuttings of it before moving, I have never taken cuttings of hydrangeas before and have been surprised to see how easy it was – they are already having one flower each!

I just have to show you a few dahlias before I round up, they are starting to flower and there will be many more next month, but look at this one, ‘Nuit D’Ete’. I can’t get the colours right through my camera, it is much darker, absolutely lovely.

And this one is sure to be one of my favourite dahlias, ‘Edge of Joy’.

Final flowers, my Agapanthus 'Navy Blue' spent 2 weeks from first crack of bud to fully open flower. Well worth waiting for! And there are several more flowers to come.

Final photo, my cat has found a new favourite place to sleep, in my new house he can see through the window out into the garden if he lies on top of the sofa – so that’s where he sleeps now.

I got a movie for you this month too, I know you have seen a lot of my garden through the photos, but I am sure you will get a completely different experience watching the movie. Photos can only show so much – let me invite you for a short walk through my little garden. As always, my movies are best viewed in full screen, just remember to change to HD for best quality in the bottom right corner.





I am linking this post to Helen at The Patient Gardener’s Weblog.

That was it for today, I am doing short updates via my Facebook page, if you want to keep track on what’s going on in my garden you are welcome to send me a friend request on facebook.com/helene.u.taylor
Until next time, take care.


EDIT:
If you are reading my post in a different language you are probably aware that Google sometimes throw up some hilarious translations. I often read through my post in Norwegian just to see what it will look like as I know I have Norwegian readers who use the Translate Function on the top of the page. This time Google have really done it....
When I wrote about my fuchsias I first wrote fuchsia gall mite – which Google translated fine. In the next paragraph I used the abbreviation FGM, which Google Translate didn’t just translate to the same – in Norwegian it wrote Female Genital Mutilation!!
It took a few seconds for me to understand how that word could have come into my text....but I can assure everyone, there is no mutilation going on in my fuchsia garden :-)

48 comments:

  1. Wow! Those are some cool temperatures for July. Here in Southeast Texas, it got up to 102 degrees Fahrenheit this week. Our weather is hot, humid, and dry with no break in sight. Your garden looks lovely and your cat looks very comfortable! Cheers.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. July has been the month of great contrasts, from extremely hot to the coldest I can remember. We are back into low 20s C with a promise of warmer weather next week.

      Delete
  2. Your garden seems a lot bigger than your previous one. Perhaps it is because you have taken down the fence. It's looking good, even with everything still in pots. There is huge potential there and the lilies are spectacular!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This garden is about 40% bigger, 104 m2 instead of the 62 m2 I had before. Still a small garden, but that extra space really makes a difference. I have so many things I want to make room for.... :-)

      Delete
  3. Ja, det har vært kjølig i juli her også. En morgen var det kun 5 grader her, og det må sies å være kaldt selv her...
    Håper at august bli bli mye varmere!

    Nydelig daglilje den 'Blackberries and Cream'! Så mange flotte liljer du har. 'Muscadet' er en av mine favorittliljer :)

    Katten din har funnet seg en flott plass, ja!

    God helg!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jeg tror ikke jeg kan få nok liljer i hagen min, har planer om flere neste vår – og flere dagliljer også, må bare få organisert blomsterbedene litt så jeg kan få plantet det jeg har før jeg begynner å kjøpe mere :-)
      God helg til deg og!

      Delete
  4. Very impressive progress Helene. your soil seems to be quite fertile - pity about pH 7.5. No lime evermore!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope my plants will forgive the pH while I keep treating the soil the same way I did in my previous garden. I never did a soil test there so I have no idea what I started with and ended up with, I just know what grew there :-)

      Delete
  5. It's interesting to see how the garden is developing, you are making great progress.
    Do you ever get lily beetles as we had to abandon lilies because of it?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Sue, yes the lily beetles are a nuisance down here in London too, but I treat my soil with an organic pesticide made of fermented soy oil and herbs and it works very well against lily beetles. Works also against aphids. I have got so many questions about this, I might write a post about how to treat against lily beetles again, I did one a few years ago, but it might be time to do another one. I could not grow all my lilies without this stuff, I buy it from Bakker.co.uk.

      Delete
  6. Amazing tour through your garden, H ... thank you for taking me along ... so loved it ... Love, cat.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, glad you liked it, the garden is very much a work in progress and will hopefully look better and better :-)

      Delete
  7. Beautiful tour and movie. Those lilies are just stunning. I wish you could send us the scent because I enjoy them so much.

    The work you have done is paying off beautifully.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Shirley, I wish you could come and stand on the step at my front door and just take it all in – it is an amazing scent :-)

      Delete
  8. Always a pleasure to see how things are going Helene. I do look forward to your monthly posts and again you never fail to amaze me.
    The lilies are the real stars of the show this month aren't they?
    I must admit that when I saw you had used the abbreviation FGM Female Genital Mutilation came to mind but I think that's only because I watched a documentary on TV about it the other night and it was fresh in my mind.
    Are there any schools locally that would take your excess harvest from you for the kids? I know my brother used to send his plums in with the kids and the school really appreciated them.
    Keep up the good work!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Angie, it’s funny how some abbreviations can have more than one meaning, I have been doing so much research into fuchsia gall mite that it didn’t occur to me that FGM meant anything else – until I saw the translation!
      I am not sure about giving away the fruit to schools, I would be worried they had strict hygiene rules, sometimes Health and Safety in this country seems to have gone absolutely mad. I have given away to everyone else though, my son, the next door neighbours, my carer and even the electrician from the council that came last Thursday went away with a big plastic bag with apples :-)

      Delete
  9. I'm flabbergasted how you get on in your garden Helen, it is a tremendous job but I can now already imagine how it will look next year with all your plants in pots on their destination. Amazing how many lilies you have, I've only two and they are always attacked by lily beetles, a nuisance. So nice to see that your cat is enjoying the new home.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Janneke, my garden is very much a work in progress, but I enjoy it and much prefer working in the garden than indoors – so I am afraid I haven’t done much to the house yet! As for the lily beetles, as I replied to Sue, I might write a post about this topic since so many are mentioning it, there is help to get against lily beetles, perfectly harmless to the environment and you only treat the plants every 4 weeks, although I choose to do it as soil treatment as I have so many plants so it is easier to pour it on the soil and do a bit of top-up with spray if necessary.
      You can buy it from Bakker here:
      http://www.bakker-hillegom.nl/product/pireco-bladinsecten

      Delete
  10. You're making steady progress, Helene. I'm especially impressed about how much you've managed to tackle given that you're still dealing with a crutch. I'm amazed at the amount you have in bloom in July, which is when our garden really hits the skids due to the hot, dry conditions here. Your lilies are incredible and seeing them makes me resolute to plant more next year. They don't last long in my Southern California area but we can get a few years of enjoyment out of them before they perish.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Kris, I do much of my gardening sitting down on my stool, over the years I have adapted my gardening style and got tools to suit a sit-down approach. However, picking apples has not been possible sitting down yet, but I am looking into different options with long handled pickers with a bag – I am sure I could manoeuvre one of those from my stool :-)
      We haven’t had any decent rain since February, except for that 24 hour rain last week, I am afraid my green plants are a result of me watering with a hose – that’s why the lawn is yellow, I don’t spend water on it. I am sure you can find lilies that will do well, some can grow in full shade and be happy there, Lilium regale for example, and they last longer in shade too.

      Delete
  11. Fabulous harvest of fruit and flower Helene....I am especially smitten with all the lilies as many of mine have disappeared because of critters...and now lily beetle has attacked them...oh well I will live through yours...love the idea of the raised bed area and the greenhouse. I can't wait to see once you begin to plant. I wish I had a longer garden season....I could use it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know what you mean about longer gardening season, I used to live in Norway and after 16 years here in London I am still amazed by the fact that I can potter around in my garden in December and January – with plants in flower around me :-)
      I will write a post about how to tackle lily beetles later this month, seems like many of you have this problem, there is a solution to it :-)

      Delete
  12. Wow, you have made an amazing amount of progress already! Taking out that fence made a real difference. And your lilies are beautiful, no wonder everyone is commenting on them! I like to make apple cider with windfall apples, it doesn't matter if they are ripe or not. It's really easy - here's the recipe: http://www.wine-making-guides.com/speedy_apple_cider.html
    Hope you get some more nice summer weather in the next month and some rain too!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Ruth, and thanks for the link, I had a look. I am not sure if my apples are cooking or eating apples as I have no idea what variety it is. They taste OK when eating though, a bit sharp but perfectly fine to eat so probably not for cider making?
      Not much rain on the forecast I am afraid, back to watering in the evening here. Have a good week in the garden!

      Delete
  13. Dear Helene, your new garden looks already much more "like Helene" this month. I love your daylily ‘Blackberries and Cream’ and can't help but admiring all your other lilies. I didn't even know that there were so many varieties out there!
    As always, I really enjoyed watching your video!
    Warm regards,
    Christina

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Christina, there are thousands of lily varieties, you are spoilt for choices! Glad you liked the video, I like making them also for my own reference and now that I have a new garden it’s nice to have memories of my previous garden :-)

      Delete
  14. Helene: Your persistence and creativity amaze me. And, I must add, your vision! You have such a way with taking a bland canvas and making it a heavenly oasis. I had to chuckle about the lilies. I clipped some Stargazers the other day and put them in a vase--outside, but by the back door. Every time the fishman walked in that door for several days, he would exclaim about the strong scent of the lilies. He said the scent reminded him of funerals or weddings--which makes sense because many people use Stargazers for special events. LOL. I'm amazed at your garden progress!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for your kind words Beth :-)
      I try to think of each task in the garden as one task, and not think of all the things still to do – if I did I would get rather overwhelmed! I still haven’t made any final decisions about the planting, I think the garden will tell ME where everything should go, once I have cleared away everything I definitely don’t want. I will however have to read up about my plants again, as many of them were forced to live under much shadier conditions than they actually had to in my previous garden. Here in my new garden they can be let loose in more sunshine than they have ever seen before! I just have to be careful I don’t accidentally plant shady plants in the sun so a bit of research is probably wise :-)

      Delete
  15. You've done so much to your garden in such a short time! Adding soil acidifier will drop the pH of your garden soil much quicker than waiting for the bark to decompose. I really like your 'Blackberries and Cream' daylily. What a beauty!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, I think 'Blackberries and Cream' is high on my daylily list this year!
      I have looked into using sulphur, which is the most common soil acidifier used here in UK, but it has to be dug in so not really possible for me to do – I am not good at digging, especially not the concrete soil I have in this garden. Sulphur applied to the surface will take many years to work down to even just 25-30cm level which is what I need for my rhododendrons and camellias.
      I haven’t found any better way so far than adding compost and bark to the surface and wait for the nature to work its magic, I will plant with lots of ericaceous compost in the planting holes and hope the plants will be happy while waiting :-)

      Delete
  16. I have so much respect for you. Bit by bit you creating you new paradise.
    It's already beautiful.
    Have a wonderful week ahead Helene.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for your kind words Marijke, it is a slow process but I am enjoying it, and the funny thing is – I don’t really miss my old garden! I thought I would miss it terribly, but I don’t. Probably because I took so many of my plants with me, and because I moved to a better and slightly bigger garden :-)

      Delete
  17. Hi, Helene!
    I'm glad you decided to purchase your own greenhouse. I think it will be very useful for you to store, to have cuttings, seedling etc. I also was shocked to write that you pulled the fence out - sure it was hard work. Your photos show hoe much your garden changed since the first days you moved to.
    The video is wonderful as always, I especially liked the music 'Coppélia' by French composer Léo Delibes that reminded me my childhood.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Nadezda, yes, getting a greenhouse is quite high on my wish-list, but it is quite expensive so I will have to save up first. Might be next spring before I will be able to buy one. Getting the fence out was really hard work, I did it over several days and then my son came and drove all of it off to the Council’s Rubbish Tip.

      I am glad you liked the video, I forgot to write what the music was this time, you are right the first and last part was by Léo Delibes, but it was not from 'Coppélia' – but Pizzicato from ‘Sylvia’.
      By the way, 'Coppélia' has lots of nice music too, I might use it in my videos in the future, the opening Mazurka sounds soooo Norwegian! The first time I heard it I thought it was composed by Grieg or Halvorsen or some other Norwegian composer from that period :-)

      Delete
  18. Helene, you may have a lot to do yet but everything is taking shape in your new garden, and what about those apples and plums, love it. Finished off the post with a touch of Norwegian comedy, what else can we ask for. Oh, I got one of those glass pergola things for above our patio door, should have got one much larger, supposed to be diy, but rather tricky to do on your own.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Alistair, I can imagine setting you one of those glass verandas on your own would be hard work, I would have to get someone in to do it – not sure if I can ever afford even the DIY kit but I can at least dream :-)

      Delete
  19. You're getting a greenhouse! That's brilliant news! I am SO jealous! You are moving mountains in your new garden and I love that the fruit trees are so bountiful. Blimey, you've got to keep an eye on translations.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I HOPE to get a greenhouse at least, they are rather expensive but if I ask my family to chip together for the next birthdays and Christmases….. Hint! Hint!...perhaps I will have one eventually :-)

      As for the translations – Google throws up some hilarious things at times, it insist on translating ‘tubs and containers’ in to the Norwegian words for ‘bathtubs and boxes’ – so it looks like I have my plants in bathtubs and cardboard boxes in my garden. I have no idea what it does in other languages, just imagine how many languages my blog could be translated into…..and how many possible silly and/or questionable versions! Makes me giggle, well you could cry I suppose but I can’t take responsibility for it, I hope every reader who use the Google translate will be aware of the limits this type of translation obviously has :-)

      Delete
  20. I can't believe how much work you have done already. Helene, this garden is going to be a paradise by the time you get through with it!. Everything is blooming so beautifully in their pots, imagine how happy they will be to get their feet in the soil :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Rosemary, I have a vision of how I would like the garden to be, it will take time but I am slowly getting there!

      Delete
  21. Things are certainly coming together Helene, is their any particular reason that you want to grow vegetables and strawberries in raised beds, you are so good at producing a display of flowering plants I wonder if it would be truly worthwhile for you? Contrary to what the media tells you growing vegetables/salads etc. on a small scale is usually not worth the expense or effort and can also cause a lot of frustration.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Over the years I have tried a few types of vegetables and found some of it too much of a hassle and others just not economical – but since I live alone and shop my groceries online and have them delivered once a week or even less at times, there are a few things that really make sense to grow myself. I eat tomatoes and a frozen mix of strawberries and raspberries every single day of the year. With two tumbler plants of tomatoes I am self-supported with tomatoes from July to October and if I get the greenhouse I am planning I hope to extend that season. I have grown strawberries before and with several varieties you can have quite a long season and freeze what you can’t eat. I also hope to find room for an early and a late raspberry bush somewhere. I have also grown radish and cut-and-come again salad in the past and down here you can sow and harvest that almost all year round. Most vegetables keep in the fridge for more than a week, but they are not as nice as those I pick every day in the garden so I basically want to grow what I eat most of since I no longer go out and do the shopping.
      But I will still have room for LOTS of flowering plants everywhere :-)

      Delete
  22. Helene, I love that you do all that work, then I get to enjoy it, even if from afar and on limited basis. The delivery guys and others coming to your house must look forward to seeing the transformation you are making; the fragrance has to be delightful, and the lilies are gorgeous. I love your day lily ‘Blackberries and cream!'

    We have a similar problem of what to do with our apple harvest. My hubby loves to bake apple pies, and friends are blessed to receive them. I have tried to convince him there are other things we could do, but he resists. We do have flying squirrels that get a number of them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I used to do a lot of baking and preserving stuff, but I am not really up for standing for longer times in the kitchen anymore – I much rather spend the energy I have sitting outside in my garden on my gardening stool and do what I enjoy most :-)
      I have done a trial of freezing the last plums though, I just cut them in half and took the stone out and froze them on a tray. I will leave them until Christmas and if they taste nice then that will perhaps be the way to preserve them for years to come. The apples will probably mostly be given away.

      Flying squirrels?? It’s bad enough with the normal grey squirrels we have to battle with, can’t imagine what it would be like if they were flying too!

      Delete
  23. Hello Helene,
    Last time I visited your blog was when you were moving to your new house. You have already done so much in your new garden. Everything is planned, scheduled and it sounds that you are enjoying your new project.
    I know what you mean by saying that your garden smells beautifully. Lilies are in blooming time in my garden too and I absolutely love the perfume!
    Wishing you a lot of strenght to fulfil your plans.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Aga, things are slowly moving on here in my new garden and house, I am planning and dreaming a lot – not sure about scheduled, I have no deadlines for anything, things will be done when they are done. I am not doing a lot every week, but I am trying to be out in the garden as often as I am able to so eventually I will get things sorted. Have a good week-end!

      Delete
  24. Hej Helene! Så trevligt att få följa utvecklingen i din trädgård, du har många fina växter.
    Liljorna är otroligt vackra.
    Ha det fint!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tusen takk Maribel, hyggelig at du følger med på ferden, blir nok en laaaaang prosess men jeg syns det er morsomt med planleggingen også – en hage er aldri ferdig!
      Liljene er avblomstret for i år, siste gikk i forrige uke. Nå blir det ikke liljer før i juni til neste år – men det blir mye annet før den tid, ikke lenge før de første hellebore og snøklokker titter opp her!

      Delete