Wednesday, 3 October 2012

I’m in Fuchsia heaven!

You can have fuchsias in flower from early summer until first frost, depending on which type you have and things like temperature and sun level. They don’t like too much sun and heat and will flower nicely in deep shade, although later than with some level of sun. This year has been a strange one for us all here in UK, with a cold and wet spring and most of the summer. My fuchsias didn’t start to flower until August and haven’t really taken off until the last couple of weeks!

So when the rest of my garden is winding down for the autumn, these lovely plants keep flowering their hearts out until first frost, which can be as late as February some years here in London. I never lift my fuchsias over winter, even those labelled annuals, bedding or non-hardy, I simply pile up a bit of bark around the stems and leave them to it. Next spring I wait until they have started putting on leaves and then I cut off any dead branches from the year before. I have so-called non-hardy fuchsias that have survived both in the ground and in pots for many years this way – despite several winters with prolonged frost lately. I think these plants are tougher than we give them credit for! In total I have 13 fuchsias, but I have room for a few more and have some nice ones on my very long plant-wish-list.

Here is a photo of the left bed, with a mix of evergreens with the 5 Fuchsia 'Annabel in-between.

Fuchsia 'Annabel

Fuchsia 'Annabel

This is a trailing fuchsia, 'Sir Matt Busby', I have 5 of these too, spread out in the garden. This one is just coming into flower.

Fuchsia 'Sir Matt Busby' again, this one is in a tub in a sunny position and has been flowering since late August.

This is Fuchsia 'Mrs Popple', a hardy fuchsia, new of this year. She is already a stunner!

Fuchsia 'Mrs Popple' again, look at that deep blue colour!


And this is a non-hardy fuchsia I bought as bedding plant some years ago. It didn’t have a name so I am just calling it red and white.

This is my prima ballerina in the garden, Fuchsia 'Bella Rosella', deep purple just when it opens....

...and more uniform pink when fully opened. They are almost as big as the size of my palm.

Fuchsias are easy to care for, just remember to remove faded flowers and seedpods, as the seedpods will turn into fruit and reduce the production of new flowers. Fuchsias flowers for months on end, are great for those shady spots where other plants will struggle and come in all sizes and colours. Who can ask for more?! Until next time, take care.

14 comments:

  1. Very nice Helene... I used to do 'the fuchsia thing'... took all sorts of cuttings each fall and had a great number of cultivars... they are certainly beautiful plants but difficult here as can be quite windy. I haven't had any fuchsias in some years now... great post, Larry

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Larry, I can imagine fuchsias being difficult up in Scotland, I have beeen lucky, none has died so far :-)

      Delete
  2. I love Fuchsias! I have hanging baskets of them in my backyard every summer. They're so fascinating, I can't believe they're not fake! Just discovered the more upright cultivars this summer and have them climbing supports in two of my planters. You have a fantastic collection!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, I know what you mean by fake, they have such an amazing shape and colour, it's unbelievable sometimes!I am going to get some more blue and purple ones next year, I'm sure I can squeeze in a couple more... :-)

      Delete
  3. Fuchias do well here in spring and then our weather is just too hot. Once the heat hits, they die and need to be replaced so I quit buying them. But your pictures are so beautiful maybe I'll give them a try again.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Tammy, fuchsias that overwinter in the ground here in London seldom start to put on leaves until late May, and might not flower until July - definitely not a spring flower! Of course you can buy them ready in flower from the garden centres just about any time of the year.

      We can have very hot summers over here too, although we haven't had that for a few years now, I have all my fuchsias more or less in the shade where they do well. Maybe if you had another go, you just need to think of fuchsias as a shady plant so they survive the heat you have? And maybe you can send some heat over here next year, the last couple of summers have been awful :-)

      Delete
  4. My corner of Queensland is way too hot for fuchsias, but I have fond memories of them from growing up in Melbourne and of seeing whole hedges of them on a driving holiday in Ireland. They are a beautiful flower and you have a lovely selection.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Marisa, they sure lighten up in my autumn garden.

      Delete
  5. I dont have any fuschias at the moment as ive run out of space... they're on my wish list though!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi PJ, I'm sure you can manage to squeeze in a couple somewhere, they are not very big and thrive well in pots too. Great to move around to those bare spots left by bulbs when they are finished flowering :-)

      Delete
  6. Hi Helene,
    I absolutely love fuchsias, but don't currently have any of my own. They look like such a magical flower to me. Thanks for sharing yours. :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're welcome, Beth - they are magical, almost as if they aren't real, can't get enough of them :-)

      Delete
  7. I love fuchsias, and have grown them since I first started gardening. Only the hardiest varieties survive the winter here in Yorkshire. Although for many years I had a plant that grew as a standard, yet survived until the two recent severe winters. Last year I removed the dead stem and most of the roots, but to my surprise this year it has regrown.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What a great surprise your fuchsia survived after all, in cold summers I have had fuchsias that have looked dead until July before finally starting to emerge.

      Delete